Dances In Air, llc

3505 Old Ivy Lane NE

Atlanta, GA 30342

info@dancesinair.com

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TRAINERS!

(THE PEOPLE YOU NEED TO KNOW)  

BRAINS. BICEPS. BLISS.

THAILAND RETREAT 2019!

Shannon McKenna

Shannon McKenna was never a dancer, never a gymnast, but one hell of a tree climber. She got her B.F.A. from NYU with a concentration in physical theater and decided the summer after college, without much idea of what it meant, to become a circus artist. She packed up her life in a suitcase and began traveling the globe in search of the best coaches to teach her, teaching aerial arts to whoever wanted to learn from her, and put her work on any stage she could.

Since that fateful decision, she trained with coaches from Montreal to Berlin to Guadalajara, and obtained her coaching certification from The New England Center for Circus Arts. She teaches workshops and classes to all ages and abilities in over 20 states from Circus Smirkus in Vermont all the way to the legendary San Francisco Circus Center in California.

Her performance work has spanned from traditional shows in large arenas to intimate contemporary pieces in small black box theaters. She performs as a solo artist, a part of artistic duos, and ensembles. Career highlights include the two times she unexpectedly performed her silks number in Germany, learning to catch on the flying trapeze 6 days before a show, and hanging underneath a motorcycle on a tight wire with the Flying Espanas.

Shannon is also a published writer (for one expository essay she wrote in college about the relationship between time, space, and cannibalism). In addition to her work in the circus arts, she has made coffee, waited tables, rented bicycles, planned exotic vacations, hired comedians, lifeguarded, pretended to teach yoga, acted in plays, sold outboard motors, cut cheese, and picked lobsters to pay the bills.

Her parents still don’t know where to forward her mail.

Rachel Strickland

Classically trained in ballet since the age of three, Rachel is a dancer turned aerialist, choreographer, and variety performer.  She began her study of circus arts in 2007, in a developing a unique style and approach to aerial work, and has performed extensively across the United States and around the world.  As a performer and choreographer, Rachel is known for her innovative combinations, movement quality, and obsessive study of spiral momentum. International collaborations include devising choreography and performing with Fidget Feet Aerial Dance in Ireland, as well as the award winning show “Elements” with Natural Wings out of Perth in Western Australia.  Homemade recipes include writing and producing “Icarus” which debuted in the 2013 New Orleans Fringe Festival. She feels honored to have worked on US soil with such fine companies as ticktock, Emerald City Trapeze Arts, Madame Rex Entertainment, Kinetic Arts Productions, Trapeze World, Queensryche, and Circus Automatic.

Given to excess and quixotic tendencies, Rachel specializes in aerial hoop choreography and the practice of telling stories.

Dr. Jennifer Crane

Dr. Jennifer Crane is a physical therapist, athletic trainer, board certified

orthopedic specialist, and published author. She has worked in sports

medicine for nine years, with a wide variety of athletes and performing

artists throughout her career. In addition to specializing in circus arts,

she has also worked with Olympic athletes. In 2016, she lived in China,

working with the Chinese Olympic Teams in preparation for the Rio 2016

Olympics. Of the athletes she worked with, 18 of them went on to get an

Olympic gold medal in Rio.

 

Jen’s San Francisco practice is based at Circus Center, where she

specializes in injury prevention and treatment of circus artists. She

works closely with performing artists of all specialties and all levels, from

the brand new aerial student to professional acrobats, aerialists,

hand balancers, and contortionists. When she’s not working with circus

artists, she can usually be found standing on her hands, working on her

backbend, or spinning on a dance trapeze.

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